For carer support, call us today: 0800 2 EDANZ or (09) 5222 679

December 2023 Newsletter

In this issue...

  • Message from the Chair
  • How to Help a Child with an Eating Disorder Navigate the Holidays
  • ARFID:
    • Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in New Zealand and Australia: A scoping review
    • These are the Symptoms of ARFID, an Eating Disorder Linked to Fear and Anxiety
    • How to Support Your Child with ARFID
  • Upcoming support meeting



For many, this time of year is filled with nothing but excitement. But for those supporting someone with an eating disorder, it can be the most challenging. In this month’s newsletter we start with some tips for supporting someone with an eating disorder through the holiday season.

Also, we want to highlight some new research published just this month: a scoping review of ARFID (Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder) in New Zealand and Australia. ARFID is one of the lesser-known eating disorders that is more common in children. Alongside this new research, we provide information on ARFID and for parents supporting a child with ARFID. 

Remember: our helpline is available throughout the holiday period. The volunteers on the helpline have lived experience of supporting a loved one with an eating disorder. We have been there, we understand, and we can provide hope.

Sending you good wishes for the festive season
Wiebke



How to Help a Child with an Eating Disorder Navigate the Holidays

How to Help a Child With an Eating Disorder Navigate the Holidays

From parents.com

This article provides some helpful tips for parents about navigating the holiday season, including setting boundaries, offering support, setting a positive example and planning. More than anything, remember that you are not alone.

“It’s important to tell anyone who will be sitting at your dinner table that those well-meant comments, such as “what a big plate,” or, “you’ve lost so much weight” could actually backfire in your child’s recovery. “Remember that setting boundaries is a continuous process, and it's okay to revisit the conversation if needed,” Dr. Barr says.”

Read the article




Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in New Zealand and Australia: A scoping review

Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in New Zealand and Australia: A scoping review

This brand-new scoping review looks at research into ARFID in New Zealand and Australia – this is a valuable resource moving forward, as it outlines what we know and what we need to know to better support those living with ARFID.

“The review identifies the methods, participants, and key findings of the studies on ARFID and suggests targeted and actionable research goals for researchers and funders. It calls for more-accurate information on how common ARFID is in children, for larger-scale studies using validated measures, and emphasizes the need for education and training of healthcare professionals, and a collaborative approach to treatment.”

Read more




These are the Symptoms of ARFID, an Eating Disorder Linked to Fear and Anxiety

These are the Symptoms of ARFID, an Eating Disorder Linked to Fear and Anxiety

From BuzzFeed News

If you haven’t heard of ARFID, or are unsure what the diagnosis means, you are not alone. It is one of the lesser-known eating disorders and is often misunderstood. If you want to know more, this article provides a deep dive into ARFID symptoms and treatment.

"As more people talk about the condition and raise awareness, it can help reduce the shame that many people feel about having the disorder."

Read Article




How to Support Your Child with ARFID

How to Support Your Child with ARFID

From Veritas Collaborative

If you want to know more about what ARFID is and how you can support a child or loved one with ARFID, this article contains some great tips. Particularly, it highlights the importance of caring for yourself – something parents often neglect. It is a good reminder that:

“Taking care of yourself is an essential part of caring for someone with an eating disorder. You can best help those around you if you help yourself first."

Read the article




EDANZ Support Group Meetings

Upcoming support group meeting

EDANZ believes parents/carers have unique abilities to support one another and we hold regular meetings to which you are warmly invited. Currently, we're joining together around the country once a month thanks to videoconferencing technology. 

If you would like to participate in a virtual support group, please RSVP to info@ed.org.nz and we'll send you the link.

Next meeting:

  • December 15, 12-1pm

More information can be found on our website Parent/Carer Support Groups page

Remember: EDANZ helpline is open throughout the year – please don’t hesitate to contact us info@ed.org.nz or leave a message on the phone 0800 2 EDANZ and we will get back to you as soon as we can. If you are concerned about the safety of someone, please ring 111 or go to the Emergency Department of your nearest hospital.



"The ongoing support our family has received from EDANZ has been a vital in the recovery process of our daughter's anorexia. Having a parent who has experienced this journey and has offered stories of recovery has been invaluable to us during difficult times. Resourcing given along with facts and information about the disease has also helped us enormously." – Kate

Did you know, we receive no regular funding?

Many families have told us they consider our support to be essential and life-saving. However, we are a volunteer organisation and rely totally on donations and grants to provide our services – many of which are currently self-funded. 

Demand for our services continues to grow to unprecedented levels. With the cost pressures New Zealand is facing, donations are becoming scarce... yet they're needed more than ever before.

If you can, please consider donating to EDANZ

Your donation will enable us to continue our work providing support to families, education to healthcare providers and the community, and advocating for improved access to evidence-based treatment for all affected New Zealanders. 

Make a Donation