For carer support, call us today: 0800 2 EDANZ or (09) 5222 679

October 2023 Newsletter

In this issue...

  • Message from the Deputy Chair
  • New Research: Māori experiences of accessing treatment for eating disorders
  • Systemic barriers are keeping Māori with eating disorders from treatment
  • Eating Disorders in Children 12 and Under: Learn the Warning Signs
  • Why Body Neutrality Works Better Than Body Positivity
  • Upcoming support meetings



In this month’s newsletter, we include a focus on the experience of eating disorders among Māori. This demonstrates the added barriers created by stigma and the need for more education. We also have included an informative article on eating disorders in children and some of the lesser-known diagnoses that are more common in children under 12. The final article is a reflection piece on the difference between body positivity and body neutrality, and why the latter might feel more achievable for many of us. 

Lastly, we would like to acknowledge that school holidays can prove more challenging for those of you who are supporting people with eating disorders. As always, our group of volunteers are available if you need support.

Sending you good wishes and hope
Megan



New Research: Māori experiences of accessing treatment for eating disorders

Māori experiences of accessing treatment for eating disorders

From the Journal of Eating Disorders

This study, published earlier this year, used Kaupapa Māori methods to explore the experiences of Māori living with eating disorders. The authors conclude that more education is needed about the diversity of those with eating disorders to enable them to look beyond the stereotype, and to take seriously the concerns of whaiora and whānau who present with disordered eating concerns.

“I had this feeling like I’d be judged more because I am Māori and Māori should – we like to eat lots and we shouldn’t have any issues around food.”

Read the article




Systemic barriers are keeping Māori with eating disorders from treatment

Systemic barriers are keeping Māori with eating disorders from treatment

From The Spinoff

The systemic barriers facing Māori living with eating disorders is further discussed in this article from 2020.

“There’s a common belief and assumption that Māori don’t get eating disorders, however, there is no basis for this belief … I think this perception may create barriers for whānau and clinicians to recognise eating disorder symptoms and advocate for care.”

Read the article




Eating Disorders in Children 12 and Under: Learn the Warning Signs

Eating Disorders in Children 12 and Under: Learn the Warning Signs

From Psycom

Eating disorders are being increasingly recognised in children under 12. This article discusses some of the lesser-known eating disorder diagnoses that are more common in children

“Setting the course for a healthy relationship with food will benefit your child’s entire life. So even if you are uncertain whether there may be a problem, it never hurts to reach out to professionals. Whom can you talk to today to get help for your child?”

Read the article




Why Body Neutrality Works Better Than Body Positivity

Why Body Neutrality Works Better Than Body Positivity

From TIME

A nice reflection piece on body positivity vs body neutrality – the latter being more achievable for many of us.

Body Neutrality "offers a safe place to rest as you exit body hatred, without putting pressure on you to somehow magically love every iota of your body and self. Body neutrality invites us to understand ourselves and others as whole human beings first, and to form our concept of worth, value, and identity around a person’s internal self instead of their external self."

Read the article




EDANZ Support Group Meetings

Upcoming support group meetings

EDANZ believes parents/carers have unique abilities to support one another and we hold regular meetings to which you are warmly invited. Currently, we're joining together around the country once a month thanks to videoconferencing technology. 

If you would like to participate in a virtual support group, please RSVP to info@ed.org.nz and we'll send you the link.

We alternate monthly between evening and daytime meetings.

Upcoming meetings:

  • October 13, 12-1pm
  • November 13, 7-8pm
  • December 15, 12-1pm

More information can be found on our website Parent/Carer Support Groups page

Remember: EDANZ helpline is open throughout the year – please don’t hesitate to contact us info@ed.org.nz or leave a message on the phone 0800 2 EDANZ and we will get back to you as soon as we can. If you are concerned about the safety of someone, please ring 111 or go to the Emergency Department of your nearest hospital.



"The ongoing support our family has received from EDANZ has been a vital in the recovery process of our daughter's anorexia. Having a parent who has experienced this journey and has offered stories of recovery has been invaluable to us during difficult times. Resourcing given along with facts and information about the disease has also helped us enormously." – Kate

Did you know, we receive no regular funding?

Many families have told us they consider our support to be essential and life-saving. However, we are a volunteer organisation and rely totally on donations and grants to provide our services – many of which are currently self-funded. 

Demand for our services continues to grow to unprecedented levels. With the cost pressures New Zealand is facing, donations are becoming scarce... yet they're needed more than ever before.

If you can, please consider donating to EDANZ

Your donation will enable us to continue our work providing support to families, education to healthcare providers and the community, and advocating for improved access to evidence-based treatment for all affected New Zealanders. 

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